Brahminy Kite

Brahminy Kite
Haliastur Indus

Lang Merah/Tikus (Malay)

The Brahminy Kite is a familiar bird of prey and often referred to as the Singapore Bald Eagle.

It is believed that their name Brahminy results from their association with the Indian God Vishnu.

To the Iban of Malaysia it is the Bird-God of War. The Brahminy Kite’s presence is an omen to guide them in major decisions such on warfare and house building.

http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/birds/Haliastur_indus.htm


References
The second series of currency notes for Singapore issued between 1976 and 1984 featured birds. The second highest denomination note in this series: the S$1,000 note, featured a perched Brahminy Kite on the front. In Malaysia, the Brahminy Kite is the Iban god of war, Singalang Burung. It is also Kedah’s symbol. Langkawi is named after it as well: Lang Kawi being an old Malay name for the Brahminy Kite.

Variant Names
English Names: Brahminy Kite.
Scientific Names: Haliastur indus, Milvus indus.
Malay Names: Helang tikus (“Rat Raptor”), lang merah (“blood-coloured raptor”), lang kawi (“kawi raptor”).
Chinese Names: Hei Chi Yuan (“black-winged kite”), Li Yuan (“chestnut kite”).

http://infopedia.nl.sg/articles/SIP_687_2005-01-04.html

Garuda

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Garuda
Garuda by Hyougushi in Delhi.jpg

Garuda, the Vahana of Lord Vishnu
Devanagari गरुड
Sanskrit Transliteration Garuḍa

The Garuda (Sanskrit: गरुड garuḍa, “eagle”) is a large mythical bird or bird-like creature that appears in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology.

Garuda is the Hindu name for the constellation Aquila and the Brahminy kite and Phoenix are considered to be the contemporary representations of Garuda.[1] Indonesia adopts a more stylistic approach to the Garuda’s depiction as its national symbol, where it depicts a Javanese eagle (being much larger than a kite).[2]

In Hinduism

Vishnu and Lakshmi riding on the Garuda – Painting in LACMA from Rajasthan, Bundi, c.1730

In Hindu religion, Garuda is a Hindu divinity, usually the mount (vahana) of the Lord Vishnu. Garuda is depicted as having the golden body of a strong man with a white face, red wings, and an eagle’s beak and with a crown on his head. This ancient deity was said to be massive, large enough to block out the sun.

Garuda is known as the eternal sworn enemy of the Nāga serpent race and known for feeding exclusively on snakes, such behavior may have referred to the actual Short-toed Eagle of India. The image of Garuda is often used as the charm or amulet to protect the bearer from snake attack and its poison, since the king of birds is an implacable enemy and “devourer of serpent”. Garudi Vidya is the mantra against snake poison to remove all kinds of evil.[3]

Five of Sarawak’s eight hornbill species are found in Batang Ai, including the spectacular rhinoceros hornbill, Sarawak’s state bird, which is believed by the local Iban community to act as messenger between men and gods. Ground birds include the great argus pheasant, Bulwer’s pheasant, crested and crestless firebacks, crested partridges and nightjars. There are a host of canopy-dwelling birds, which are easier heard than seen – varieties of cuckoos, tree swifts, trogons, bulbuls (15 species), drongos, barbets, woodpeckers, babblers (17 species), shamas, flycatchers, fantails, flowerpeckers, sunbirds, spiderhunters, bristleheads and the rare Malaysian honeyguide. Amongst the other birds present are two species of kingfisher, which are regarded as omen birds by the local Iban population, a number of small kites and hawks, and at the top of the food chain the brahminy kite, believed by traditional Ibans to be the embodiment of Singalang Burung, the god of war.

http://www.sarawakforestry.com/htm/snp-np-batangai.html

Vishnu

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Vishnu
Mahabharata06ramauoft 0678.jpg
Protection and sustenance
Devanagari विष्णु
Sanskrit Transliteration viṣṇu
Tamil script விஷ்ணு
Affiliation Supreme Being, Trimurti
Abode Vaikuntha, Ksheera Sagara
Mantra Om Vishnave Namah, Om Namo Bhagavate Vasudevaye, Om Namo Narayanaye, Hari Om
Weapon Sudarshana Chakra, Kaumodaki Mace, Panchajanya Shankha
Consort Lakshmi (Shri)
Mount Garuda
Texts Bhagavata Purana, Bhagavad Gita, Vishnu Purana
An article related to
Hinduism
Om.svg

Vishnu is a Vedic Supreme God in Hinduism. [1][2] Vishnu is also known as Narayana and Hari. He is venerated as the Supreme Being in Vaishnavism and as Purushottama or Supreme Purusha in ancient sacred texts like the Bhagavad Gita.[3] The Vishnu Sahasranama declares Vishnu as Paramatman (supreme soul) and Parameshwara (supreme God). It describes Vishnu as the all-pervading essence of all beings, the master of—and beyond—the past, present and future, the creator and destroyer of all existences, one who supports,preserves, sustains and governs the universe and originates and develops all elements within.

In Hindu sacred texts, Vishnu is described as having the divine blue color of water-filled clouds and as having four arms. He is depicted as holding a padma (lotus flower) in the lower left hand, a unique type of mace used in warfare known as a Kaumodki gada in the lower right hand, a Panchajanya shankha (conch) in the upper left hand and a discus weapon Sudarshana Chakra in the upper right hand. Vishnu is also described in the Bhagavad Gita as having a ‘Universal Form’ (Vishvarupa or Viraat Purusha) which is beyond the ordinary limits of human perception or imagination.[4]

Vishnu’s eternal and supreme abode beyond the material universe is called Vaikuntha, which is also known as Paramdhama, the realm of eternal bliss and happiness and the final or highest place for liberated souls who have attained Moksha. Vaikuntha is situated beyond the material universe and hence, cannot be perceived or measured by material science or logic.[5] Vishnu’s other abode within the material universe is Ksheera Sagara (the ocean of milk), where he reclines and rests on Ananta Shesha, (the king of the serpent deities, commonly shown with thousand heads). In almost all Hindu denominations, Vishnu is either worshipped directly or in the form of his ten avatars, the most famous of whom are Rama and Krishna.[6] The Puranabharti, an ancient text, describes these as the dashavatara, or the ten avatars of Vishnu. Among the ten described, nine have occurred in the past and one will take place in the future as Lord Kalki, at the end of Kali Yuga, (the fourth and final stage in the cycle of yugas that the world goes through). These incarnations take place in all Yugas in cosmic scales; the avatars and their stories show that gods are indeed unimaginable, unthinkable and inconceivable. The Bhagavad Gita mentions their purpose as being to rejuvenate dharma,[7] to vanquish those negative forces of evil that threaten dharma and also to display His divine nature in front of all souls.

The Trimurti (three forms) is a concept in Hinduism “in which the cosmic functions of creation, maintenance, and destruction are personified by the forms of Brahma the creator, Vishnu the maintainer or preserver, and Shiva the destroyer or transformer.”[8][9] These three deities have also been called “the Hindu triad”[10] or the “Great Trinity”,[11] all having the same meaning of three in One. Of the three members of the Trimurti, the Bhagavata Purana, which espouses the Vaishnavite viewpoint, claims that the greatest benefit can be had from worshipping Vishnu.[12]

Vishnu is also venerated as Mukunda,[13] which means Supreme God who is the giver of mukti or moksha (liberation from the cycle of rebirths) to his devotees or the worthy ones who deserve salvation from the material world.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vishnu

The Garuda (Sanskrit: garuḍa गरुड, eagle; Pāli garuḷa; Burmese: ဂဠုန်, [ɡəlòuɴ]; Tamil: karutan; Thai/Lao/Khmer: khrut ครุฑ; Mongolian: гарьд) is a large mythical bird or bird-like creature that appears in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology.

From an Indian perspective, Garuda is the Hindu name for the constellation Aquila and the Brahminy kite is considered to be the contemporary representation of Garuda.[1]

Other nations adopt a more stylistic approach to the Garuda’s depiction, where it depicts an eagle (being much larger than a kite).[2]

In Hinduism

In Hindu religion, Garuda is a lesser Hindu divinity, usually the mount (vahanam) of Vishnu. Garuda is depicted as having the golden body of a strong man with a white face, red wings, and an eagle’s beak and with a crown on his head. This ancient deity was said to be massive, large enough to block out the sun.

http://www.princeton.edu/~achaney/tmve/wiki100k/docs/Garuda.html

Garuda – the Divine Vahana of Vishnu

 

 

Namah pannaganaddhaaya vaikunta vasavardhineh |
Sruti-sindhu Sudhothpaada-mandaraaya Garutmathe ||

“I bow to Garuda, the One with the beautiful wings, whose limbs are adorned by the mighty serpents, who he has conquered in battle. I bow to the One who is forever in the devotion of his Lord, Vishnu. He is as adept as the Mandara Mountain, in churning the ocean of the Vedas, capturing the very essence of their wisdom.”

– the first two lines of the Garuda Stotra

 

Garuda, the Mighty Eagle

Garuda is a large, mythical Eagle, which appears prominently in both Hindu and Buddhist mythology.  Incidentally, Garuda is also the Hindu name for the constellation Aquila. The Brahminy kite and Phoenix are considered to be the modern representations of Garuda. Garuda is the national symbol of Indonesia – this mighty creature is depicted as a large Javanese eagle.

GARUDA

In Hinduism, Garuda is an Upadevata, a divine entity, and is depicted as the vahana or mount of Sri Maha Vishnu. Garuda is usually portrayed as being a strong man; having a golden, glowing body; with a white face, red wings, and an eagle’s beak. He is adorned with a crown on his head.  This very ancient deity is believed to have a gigantic form, large enough to block out the Surya Devata or the Sun God.

Garuda is widely known to be a permanent and sworn enemy of the Nagas, the ones belonging to the serpent race – it is believed that Garuda fed only on snakes. This behavior bears reference to the short-toed Eagle, which can be found in India. The image of Garuda is often worn as a charm or amulet, as it is believed to protect the wearer from snake attacks and poison. In fact, Garuda Vidya is the mantra which is often used as a palliative measure to destroy the ill-effects of snake poison and also to remove all sorts of evil the victim has been afflicted with.

Garuda is generally shown as winding the mighty Adisesha serpent on his left wrist and the serpent Gulika on his right wrist. The great serpent Vasuki winds around him to form his sacred thread. Takshaka, the cobra, winds on his hip to serve as a belt. He wears the serpent Karkotaka as his necklace. Further, the snakes Padma and Mahapadma are his earrings. The serpent Shankachuda adorns his hair as a crown.

Garuda is depicted as flanked by his two wives Rudra and Sukeerthi in an ancient Soumya Keshava temple in Bindiganavile in Karnataka state of India.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garuda

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